Gosht, a meaty Pakistani dish, is made by stewing mutton (or lamb) in spices for a while. When it’s done, it is served with rice and naan, for a hearty, spicy meal that may be spicy in more ways than one. Every family has their own way of making gosht, and everyone treats it with their own twist. By adding black pepper and garlic, I have made it a bit spicy, while the addition of coconut milk gives it a creaminess that I love.

A lot of people are now familiar with the term Curry, but that’s not the only dish that can be cooked using Black pepper and other spices. Here is a recipe for a traditional Pakistani style black pepper lamb curry. This is a simple yet very tasty dish and will be enjoyed by everyone at your next dinner party.

There is no secret to the recipe, all you need is to make marinade from onion, garlic, ginger, coriander, turmeric and dry red chili; then meat and veggies and cook over slow flame.. Read more about gosht and let us know what you think.

Pepper Mutton/Lamb Curry is a spicy and flavorful black pepper curry that just requires a few ingredients. For black pepper fans, this is a must-try meal. It’s known as kali mirch gosht ka salan in Urdu/Hindi. During chilly winter days, or when someone at home has a cold, cough, or is recuperating from a fever, this dish appears more often than normal in households. My mother taught me how to make this dish. The curry has a sweet and spicy flavor because to the onion and black pepper combo. When I make this curry, I serve it with plain rice and a squeeze of lemon juice, which adds a sour note to the spicy flavor of the black pepper.

Time to prepare: 10 minutes

Time to cook: 35 minutes

Andhra cuisine (home style)

Medium spiciness

1-2 servings

Ingredients

    • 450 gms mutton/lamb
    • 5 tbsp. oil
    • Cloves (about 5 cloves)
    • 2 cinnamon sticks (2 inch each)
    • 4 green cardamoms
    • 2 tsp ginger and garlic paste
    • 1/2 teaspoon black pepper (freshly ground, coarse powder)
    • 1 cup of water
    • a pinch of salt (to taste)

Garnishing

    • 2 tbsp coriander leaves

Paste

  • 2 or 170 gms onion (medium size)
  • 1/3 cup coriander leaves
  • 1 tsp to 1 1/2 tsp black pepper corns

Method

  • With its thin stalk, coarsely chop onion and coriander leaves.
  • Combine the onion, peppercorns, and coriander leaves in a paste. Keep the paste aside after it has been ground. You may use freshly ground coarse powder instead of pepper corns while grinding.
  • Take any vessel, such as a pressure cooker. Combine the oil, mutton chunks, whole spices, ginger and garlic paste, ground paste, and black pepper powder, and cook according to the directions on your cooker. With my cooker, 3 to 4 whistles was plenty to cook the meat.
  • Allow a few minutes for the pressure (steam) to dissipate.
  • Open the lid, add the salt, and give it a good swirl.
  • If the gravy is too thin, simmer for a few more minutes until it reaches the desired consistency and begins to leave oil.
  • Simmer for approximately 5 minutes before turning off the heat.
  • If using a kadai, combine all ingredients (mutton/lamb may need more water), cover, and simmer until the mutton is well cooked and a gravy consistency has developed. Continue to cook for another 5 minutes before turning off the heat. Stir it every now and then to keep it from sticking to the vessel.
  • The gravy is spicy in appearance. With rice, chapathi, naan, or pulao, serve the pepper mutton curry.
  • Serve the gravy over simple rice and a squeeze of lemon juice. It will be sour and spicy, and it will be delicious.

Notes

  • I made a semi-gravy pepper mutton curry (thick gravy that coats the meat/lamb).
  • If you don’t have a pressure cooker, you may use any pot or kadai to prepare this meal.
  • To create an onion paste, crush black peppercorns with the onion or add finely powdered pepper powder to the onion.
  • The color of the paste changes when the coriander leaves are ground.
  • If the mutton isn’t done yet, add additional water and continue to cook.
  • This meal may also be made using chicken.