Halloween is almost here. And so I thought while I was writing this, why not share the story of the pumpkin tree with you? There are several stories about its origins, but I can sum it up in one sentence because it’s basically just about pumpkins.

Yes, I am aware. “Where is he heading with this story?” you wonder. “I’ll give him 10 seconds to attract my interest before I take my crazy interweb talents somewhere, yo,” and “I’ll give him ten seconds to pique my interest before I take my mad interweb skills elsewhere, yo.” We have the world’s first pumpkin in a tree. BAM….dismisses the microphone and exits the stage. Anyway, now that you know about this miracle, I’ll keep writing until the sun rises and provides me the chance to take photographic evidence of my crazy claim, while also devising a method to charge admission for seeing this magnificent display of nature’s beauty.

Our landlord hired three hired hands (3 guys, for a total of 6 hands) and a tiny, worn-out tractor to plow down and clear up the weeds growing amid the trees in our semi-private orchard last weekend. Unfortunately, the huge pumpkin patch, as well as virtually every ground-clinging, wall (and tree) climbing vine, perished along with the weeds. We were saddened to see the pumpkin patch go since one of the vines had found better pastures by scaling a 4 foot rock wall, slithering through wrought iron, and eventually settling and producing a small pumpkin in a seldom used section of our driveway. This, too, had vanished. “Hand me a Kleenex, Tito.”

We were scanning the trees for ripe fruit over the fence when something grabbed my wife’s attention. Not one, but two pumpkins, each the size of a soccer ball, were disguised and snuggled amid the leaves of an orange tree, but hung 5 feet above the ground. “Nature finds a way,” to paraphrase a line from Jurassic Park. Everyone have a wonderful Halloween!

With Halloween right around the corner, we might as well get some use out of those pumpkins we’ve been collecting over the past few months. I mean, after all, we’re not going to eat them, right? I mean, we’re just going to carve them, right? And we’re not really going to eat the gooey insides of those little pumpkins, right? Right?. Read more about the halloween tree novel and let us know what you think.

Frequently Asked Questions

Is The Halloween Tree accurate?

The Halloween Tree is a childrens book written by John Kettler and illustrated by David Catrow. It was published in 1978, and has been translated into many languages.

What is the theme of the Halloween tree?

The theme of the Halloween tree is Halloween.

What is the plot of the Halloween tree?

The plot of the Halloween tree is that its a haunted house.